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29 December 2011

Gothic Photography


Gothic photography is an elusive term that is almost as hard to define as Goth culture itself. Although some Goth photography is dark, somber and macabre, the subjects of gothic photography can be more diverse than cemeteries and desolate landscapes. Goth photography may include portraits that range from being serious and fetishistic to playful and darkly humorous. 
Because of the centrality of the colors black and white to Goth culture, black and white film is a natural choice for Goth photography. By removing colorfrom photographs, black and white Goth photography can concentrate on the interplay of light and shadows. Cemetery photos are popular, whether or not people are present in the picture.
Black and white film lends Goth photography a mysterious, nostalgic feel. Similarly, the timelessness of the black and white tones helps gothic photography set scenes that remind the viewers of life, death and other such constants.

Sepia options are available on many digital cameras. While sepia is a monochrome color scale (like black and white), it uses a brown-scale, rather than grayscale. With an early 1900s feel, sepia tone can produce ghostly, surreal images.
Goth photography subjects include both landscape and portraiture. Cemeteries, unusual headstones and crumbling architecture are all popular gothic photography subjects.



Some common themes for a gothic photographer may revolve around decay, isolation or desolation. Yet, gothic photography also can have a playful, even erotic, side. The PVC and leather outfits popular among Goths easily lend themselves to fetish photography, often with a nod towards 1950′s pin-up and leather goddess Betty Page.


Landscapes are common images in gothic photography. Unlike traditional landscapes, the gothic tone may not stress the beauty or color of a scene but a mood of isolation and somberness. Moors, rocky precipices and barren fields are possible subjects for gothic photography.

When taking pictures of tombstones and architecture, Goth photography often employs low angle shots, making the structure appear to tower over the viewer. Conversely, Goth photography may use macro settings to zoomin on details or imperfections in structures to stress fragility and impermanence.


Posing for Goth photography depends on the nature of the photo shoot. A photographer can capture the mysterious, languid feel of Victorian pre-Raphaelite paintings with the subject reclining on old stairs, kneeling by graves or staring dreamily into the distance.

 Other Goth photographers may wish to suggest suicide or murder or feature vampires and post-mortem themes in their creations. All to strive for an alternative, slightly macabre feel.

As part of the Goth subculture, Gothic photography focuses on the mysterious, the paranormal and the macabre.

all infos taken from www.photography.com 



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