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28 July 2011

Goths would never ever listen to classical music... First Part

While BallerinaDark is writing an article about fighting goth stereotypes, I write a little about one I could never understand.
Goths only listen to agressive and/or depressive music. O-N-L-Y.
I know, gothic is inspired by music and lifestyle, and prejudices about the outer appearance may have developed this stereotype, but it's just not true.

I've read about this some time ago on "The Ultimate Goth Guide": A festival (don't remember which one) and a classical concert in the same town. Collision of two completely different cultures. But then people just wondered why a lot of goths also appeared on this classical concert...

I think there is a lot of classical music, that is really aesthetic, dramatic, thrilling and gloomy. I want to introduce some componists and their wonderful pieces of music to you.

The first one is a really common one and I bet you heard "In the Hall of the Mountain King" and "Morning Mood" about a thousand times. It's a piece from Edvard Grieg's (15 June 1843 – 4 September 1907) "Peer Gynt Suites", where he set the play Peer Gynt from Henrik Ibsen to music. (Honestly I haven't read it yet, but it's standing in my bookshelf, waiting for me).
The two suites contain eight pieces of music:

Suite No. 1
  1. Morning Mood (Morgenstemning)
  2. Aase's Death (Åses død)
  3. Anitra's Dance (Anitras dans)
  4. In the Hall of the Mountain King (I Dovregubbens hall)
Suite No. 2
  1. The Abduction of the Bride. Ingrid's Lament (Bruderovet. Ingrids klage)
  2. Arabian Dance (Arabisk Dans)
  3. Peer Gynt's Homecoming (Stormy Evening on the Sea) (Peer Gynts hjemfart (Stormful aften på havet))
  4. Solveig's Song (Solveigs Sång)
Here are some of my favourites you maybe havent heard that often.



I like this one a lot, I always turn the stereo up and dance and jump through the kitchen :D




I'm a big Liszt (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) fan, if he would still be alive, I bet I would stand in the very first row of a concert screaming "I want a child from you!". That guy was a piano virtuose, obsessed with this instrument, practicing for hours and hours and he wrote some really great pieces for it. Mostly all of them are concerned as really hard, and though I've tried to learn the piano for some years, I still couldn't play any of these. It's sadly only for the pros.
One of my favourite is "La Campanella", one of his etudes (a piece that is meant for the piano player to practice certain techniques) inspired by a piece from Nicolo Paganini, played by the gorgeous Evgeny Kissin (look at his hair, whils he's playing^^). Everytime I listen to this, I close my eyes and goose bumps appear on my whole body.



Here's another pretty cool one from Camille Saint-Saens (9 October 1835 – 16 December 1921) the "Danse Macabre", it really seem fitting for the goth scene ;) Everytime I listen to this, I see sceletons dancing.


Let's jump from the romantic era straight to the baroque. Although I don't like Emilie Autumn that much, I found a very good performance on her Laced album of Arcangelo Corelli's (17 February 1653 – 8 January 1713) "La Folia".
I would really like to explain in short what a Folia is, but because it's a little to complicated and long for this post, I'll just redirect you to Wiki ;)



That was the first part, I'll make others, if you're interested. Feel free to make suggestions about classical stuff you like :)


sources: www.wikipedia.com
www.youtube.com
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