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30 July 2011

Goths would never ever listen to classical music... Part 2

*Drum roll* Here's the second part.

First from my beloved composer again (did I mention that I named my dragon soft toy Franz Liszt?^^) and as suggested from Miss Esther Romaine: "The Mephisto Waltz" inspired by Johann Wolfgang von Goethes work "Faust".




This is a great piece a friend of mine introduced to me, she started playing it on the piano and showed the complete piece. I was simply amazed, a very powerful work from Frédéric Chopin (22 February or 1 March 1810 – 17 October 1849) the so called "Revolutionsetüde" (revolution étude). It's from his first set of études dedicated to his friend Franz Liszt, the official name is "Étude Op. 10, No. 12". I'm pretty sure there's a story behind that name connected with Chopins love to his home country Poland, but I couldn't find any proper information to prove it.




Two very well known works from Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized 17 December 1770– 26 March 1827), just for completeness. He's maybe the most fancied composer of all time, so there isn't that much to say about him.
I like to listen to the whole "5th symphony" from Beethoven while cleaning up, so something boring like this gets epical^^.

Nearly played to dead by every piano beginner and in general played too often and I'm on the edge of getting annoyed of it, but here it is: "Moonlight Sonata".




My former music teacher has one obsession: György Ligeti (May 28, 1923 – June 12, 2006).In the first lesson he warned us: You will hear this name really often and you will learn to hate him. But only the first part of the sentence counts for me. I even knitted a mugwarmer (don't know if something like this exists, maybe I invented it!^^) with the inscription "Ligeti" as a christmas present for him.
If you never heard of him, I'll warn you: Ligeti was a composer from the 20th century classical music. For the majority of people this kind of music is just mind-blowing and they can't stand listening to it. But I hope you give it a try.
If you ever watched some of Stanley Kubrick's movies - like for example 2001: A Space Odyssey - and you wondered about the strange music in the background: it's from Ligeti. Here's one piece from this particular movie: "Lux Aeterna"


I found this one by accident looking for another piece I've just "lost", because somehow the folder on my computer has vanished... It's really sudden, scary and funny, but I somehow like it a lot.


This is another great piece of him I discovered. And I found an interesting description of it on the youtube commentaries:

"This piece is supposed to be a network of states which get interrupted and transformed by fixed events. It's based on a childhood dream of his in which he was caught in a web with a collection of other organisms. Every movement made by any organism, he said, would cause a massive wave of vibrations and reciprocal vibrations in the web which caused irreversible changes to take place in the web's internal structure." FutureMoth


Just a fun fact at the end: György was born in Transylvania.

Okay, maybe you have expected some a little older pieces here, but I'm talking about classical music as serious music (as people call it). Although I don't care about the name that much, I have a simliar opinion as
Kurt Weill.

"I have never acknowledged the difference between 'serious' music and 'light' music. There are only good music and bad music." Kurt Weill

As I still have some pieces I want to show you, but I just can't remember the names, maybe there will be a third part out soon ;)
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